Best Caramel Apple Dip

After many attempts to perfect this recipe, I’ve yet again mutated it into a dip that gets completely devoured at parties. The reason is it’s not “too caramelly,” which is a way of saying the caramel is overpower. Personally, I hate things that are overdone, which is what the original recipes is. This isn’t. It’s perfectly balanced between the caramel, cream cheese and marshmellow. For those people (e.g. men) who claim to hate cream cheese, they can’t even tell. As in, my husband Roger, hates the divine, bovine created product. Even he loves it. This recipe is a winner.

Requirements
A beater with a three-pronged paddle. The creamcheese need to be room temperature (softened, but not warmed in a microwave. I’ve done this and it curdles the product, ruining it).

Ingredients
1 package (8 oz) cream cheese. tip: on this, don’t go light. go full cream cheese. the consistency is much better and creamier
1/2 cup packed brown sugar (dark has richer flavor, but I prefer the light brown)
1/2 cup caramel- I hate the liquid, ice cream topping this calls for. Most versions have a horrid aftertaste. Go for the kind in a container. it’s very thick and can be found an most all grocery stores.
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup marshmallow crème
3 medium tart apples
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons water

Directions
In a small bowl, beat the cream cheese, brown sugar, caramel topping and vanilla until smooth. Fold in the marshmallow crème. Cut apples into vertical thin slices–I actually use my fun, holiday cookie cutters just to be different.

In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice and water. Toss the apples in the lemon juice mixture. Drain. (it prevents the apples from turning brown).

Tip for serving: you have a lot of fun options for making a simple dip look impressive. You can:

a) drizzle some caramel on the top
b) add nuts of any type to the top
c) put paprika on the top (don’t use Hungarian Paprika though. it’s too strong and will give a weird aftertaste whereas regular paprika won’t).

Lastly, on the color and flavor. If you want a darker look, simply add more caramel. This will enhance the flavor. Adjust to taste.

Halloween Treats – Meringue Bones

A light weight, gluten-free party favorite for all ages is bones. I’m talking meringue bones. It’s simple, fast and impressive. Most important, it doesn’t require a fancy icing tip. As a backdrop, I’ve tried a number of recipes from major sites, and I hated all of them save one, and even that, I modified. The following has a basis in the recipe from fishieking on allrecipes. My first round, I didn’t totally like the consistency of the bones (too mushy both in the better and final outcome). I increased the amount of cream of tartar just a hair and it was perfect.

Tip: make sure the Cream of Tartar (its a spice, just in case you haven’t heard of it), is within the expiration date. The first batch was ruined, and I looked at the culprit, which turned out to be 6 months overdue on the expiration. The next batch made with a brand new bottle turned out normally.

Requirements
Egg beater, big Ziploc plastic bag, parchment paper to line the cookie sheet.

Ingredients
6 egg whites (room temperature)
3/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 pinch salt
1 1/3 cups white sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract (I used bourbon or Madagascar vanilla. it makes a huge difference)

Directions
Preheat oven to 225 degrees F (110 degrees C). Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper (I prefer this to the tinfoil in the original recipe. it’s less sticky)

Beat the egg whites with cream of tartar and salt with an electronic mixer until egg whites are foamy. Gradually beat in sugar, a few tablespoons at a time, beating until the sugar dissolves in the meringue before adding more. Continue beating until the meringue is glossy and forms sharp peaks. Add the vanilla. At this point, the batter should be very gloppy (a technical term of course).

Spoon the batter into a Ziploc or pastry bag.

Tip: when I read this direction, I thought great. Reality is that I use a large KitchenAid mixer and couldn’t hold the bowl, and the Ziploc and spoon the stuff. I enlisted my husband, who held the bowl as I used a spatula to slide the batter into the bag.

Cut the end of the tip with a scissors.

Tip for formation of the bones.

Start at the upper left hand corner, draw down to the bottom of the V. Then go up to the right of the V. Quickly take the tip straight down for the long center. Then draw down for the lower left, then up to the base V then down to the lower right. Lift up the tip.

I made a few testers, which necessitated me changing the grip of my bag. It’s easy enough to push out, but half-way through, the bag will deflate and air bubbles will collect. To prevent this, stop, open the bag, squeeze out the air then resume.

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Meringue bones – gluten free party favorite

Key directions for cooking

Place the cookie sheets and bake for 1 hour. Do NOT open the oven door, not even to peek. I ignored this part of the directions (thinking it wouldn’t make a difference. It did. They flopped). So, lesson learned. Leave it shut for an additional hour. (seriously. do not skip this).

When removing the bones, slide off the parchment paper onto a rack. Wait until cooled, then place in an air tight container.

Tip for storage

The original recipe didn’t give any commentary on storage, but I read that they could be sealed, room temperature for several days. I made one batch on Tuesday, thinking they would be fine for Saturday. Well, I checked on Thursday, and they’d become really brittle. By Friday, they were falling apart at the touch, with the exception of a few of the thicker ones. That meant I ended up creating a new batch, which I served the following day.

Pictures show the formation and the outcome.

By the way- I had these on a “gluten free” table, but all the guests had them- adults and kids (about 50 total). They were the first to go!

Halloween kid games (but work for adults)

Graveyard bowling

Graveyard bowling

Fourthings to do that work equally well for kids and adults, because really, when it comes to Halloween, adults revert back decades, dress silly, act sillier, and generally have no shame when it comes to what happens in the darkened rooms of a Halloween party.

Graveyard bowling

All you need is an empty space about 10 5-8 feet long. Carpet works, as does cement or wood. What you need:

  1. A sign. Pumpkin bowling. $3 bucks for the black cardboard. white spraypaint. tacks.
  2. old water bottles, 1/3 full of water and red food coloring (strip off the label).
  3. round, white cut outs on taped to the floor. 10 of them.dsc_0907
  4. smallish pumpkins.

Place the bottles on the floor. Behind the bottles, tack the cardboard. Walla. You are done. I was surprised how many adults wanted to play this bowling game. It was hilarious.

 

Mummy wrapping

This was a party fav two years ago with the kids & the adults had so much fun I ddsc_0901id it again. It’s easy. Teams of 2 or 3, and two rolls of toilet paper. One package from Costco means 2 rounds of ten-give or take, so the teams of two can each hav a chance to wrap and be the mummy.

Toss the finger & eat the earwax

This is easy, but unfortunately I don’t have pictures of the former and only one of the latter.

Tossing the finger means you get a bucket (we have a cauldron) and set it about 10 feet away from the kids (in a line) and they toss 3 fingers. The one to get all three wins the prize. Adults do this to. The cauldron can be on the piano, side-stool, inside or out. You’d be surprised how few people can get the finger in (or eyeballs work) in the cauldron!

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Earwax on a bone

The second game is awesome! This came about when I saw this Pinterest idea for earwax on a stick. I modified the idea by purchasing bones at the Spirit Halloween store (25 for $3.00). I then took a small marshmellow and stuck it on both ends of the small bones. After than, I melted Ghiradelli milk chocolate and dipped the ends in the chocolate. It looks like brown earwax…so grossly awesome. The game came about because the bones came with two small holes. I was able to run string (I used fishing line) through it, then hung the bones. The kids were able to see how many they could eat without the ear wax falling on the floor. Adults are way more grossed out on this game than the kids–no telling why.

Look for the recipe and other info on the earwax which doubles as a treat in other blogs.

 

 

Easy Halloween decorations

 “Make it spookier, Mom.” Famous last words. The last time I took my daughter’s recommendation, I had a jilted bride hanging by a noose off the deck, headless men in water, a two-headed baby strapped to a wall and a myriad of ancient-looking dolls that I’d morphed into something from a Victorian zombie apocalypse. It freaked out the parents probably more than the kids.

Even so, I’m in a new state this year, and that means a whole new community of parents to traumatize. My daughter, being the ripe old age of 11, insisted that her friends wanted spooky, and that the parents wouldn’t mind. I thought: hey, it is Idaho. Rog calls it the “Good luck state.” Practically no laws govern this place…helmuts for motorcycles? Nope. Gun laws? Not that we can find. And driving while talking on the cell phone? Go for it. Coming from the state of Washington, which seems as over regulated as Switzerland, this place is akin to Clint Eastwood’s spaghetti westerns free-for-all.

But I digress. Let’s get back to easy and relatively cheap (as in dollar-store cheap) decorations.

  1. Scary dolls. I love this! Hit goodwill
    spooky dolls

    Spooky doll nailed to the post

    or your local thrifts shop. I found half a dozen for about 2 dollars each. I took them home, painted the faces white (used my daughters paint set), then added some black and red. I then used some spray paint we had in the garage on a few just to make the dresses look a little beat up. Lastly, I wrapped a few up in spider web so I can could hang strategically. A few I left out (like the clown) and placed in plants–making them look like zombie dolls rising from the grave. This year, it was wet and we had the party in the outbuilding (e.g. shop, but in Idaho, it’s called an “outbuilding,” go figure), so I hung them within spider webbing.

  2. Crime scene tape. Rog gets crime scene tape for his hockey legging on line for a Off limits tapedollar. I found the same thing at the dollar store, but I chose Haunted House tape. This serves the purpose of cordoning off areas but also as a marker for down by the gate.
  3. Black tablecloth for backdrops. At the dollar store, these large rectangular table clothes are a thin plastic-like (but not quite) feel. I put them up anywhere I needed to shield out light, but also give privacy–such as to storage areas. Four bucks and the entire loft area was transformed.
  4. Window shields. I also used the black tablecloth to darken the windows and put some cracks in the fabric–resembling a rock being thrown through the window–or an old spooky window.
  5. Old-time windows. I then purchased several web/cloth like pieces of material. These tended to be about 4 dollars each, but had enough in them to cut into 2 pieces. From this, I made spooky window curtains. Hang these up with clear tacks-lots and lots of tacks.
  6. Webbing. Rule on this: not all webbing is created equal. If you purchase the webbing at the dollar store- it’s really sticky, which will adhere to most walls or wood. However, it doesn’t stretch well and isn’t strong enough to hold anything within. For that, you need to go to Target or Spirit Halloween and for this super-stretchy webbing and spend about $7 bucks on the real
    dsc_0871

    white spider web on top of stretchy webbing- pumpkin above

    stuff. I get the 30 foot, or 75 foot length, which will stretch entire sections. This stuff is amazing. It will also go about 5-7 feet high, which makes it amazingly helpful. Colors are black, white and green. If you are darkening- go black. If you have a darkroom/house already, go white. I have one of the enormous webs that I stretched from my second floor to the ground–couldn’t find it in my boxes this year (half of which are still in storage) but it’s a super buy & for $24 it makes a great impact.

  7. Gruesome tablecloth & Spooky pics area. This is one of my absolute favorites. Two years ago, I had a table decoration idea that morphed into a cool feature. The idea was to take a table cloth I found at Goodwill (white, with a lace edge). I took red, grey and black paint and strategically cut slits in the tableclothe. For the party, I then put stands with food within the slits. It was gruesomely awesome! however, I had no such need Pictures or tablecloththis time around. As you can see from the picture, I nailed it to the back wall, and put a head through one of the slits and a two-headed baby through the other. When the kids came, they took turns (in groups) putting their own heads through, and they looked like headless people.
  8. Hands from the grave. Another dollar store find is to get old dolls, skeleton or bone hand, paint it white/grey/red (if needed) and put it within your pots at the house. Also do this with fingers or mice, which are easily and cheaply found (I’m talking plastic or rubber, not the real thing!).with heads!
  9. Transforming spooky pictures. Four years ago, I actually had to pay real money (e.g. 8 bucks) for these things. Now they are 1 dollar at the cheap stores. They are fun to do. For the outbuilding, I adhered them to the walls. When I had an adult party at my home, I used special tape to adhere them to my actual pictures- so they looked framed. It was super cool and it caught a lot of adults by surprise.
  10. Entryway canopy. The photo of the entryway was a find that I believe I purchased at the Spirit Halloween store years ago. It’s purple with spider webs. I adhere it to the
    img_8661

    Doorway canopy

    entryway with either tape or at my last home, tacks. This time around, I put a headless man above the entry way, attached to the light with spider webbing as the holder. You could replicate this same thing with an old sheet, some scissor rips and paint of anykind. Oh! makeup works! Just thought I’d throw that in.

  11. Large spider webs with our without lights. Over the years, I keep an eye out for super-large spider webs of all kinds. The material varies- from nylon to spiny/rubber-like feel. Some are white, others black but most come with some type of massive spider. I have purchased orange lights from the dollar store, but I always look out for post-Halloween sales to get longer, better made varieties from Target or wherever. Wrapping these around the spider webs really sets off the room.
    1. the tip on this is to strategically place the spider webs in the corners, for maximum impact.
    2. another tip is to place a scary doll within the spider web–ideally, with a spider coming to get it.
  12. Mummies and other hanging ghouls. I picked up a super cool mummy one year that always freaks people out. It twists and turns, and was about $25, so a bit more than I usually spend. It’s only gauze wrapped around wires of varying dimensions, with the shape of feet at one end and a head at the other. It can be made easily enough, but I don’t have that kind of time.
  13. Jilted bride. One of my absolute favorites. I purchased a wedding dress for $10 at Goodwill, took my scissors to it, then got out my red spray paint and made it gnarly. I then purchased a mask from Goodwill (a really freaky woman). I put this mask on top of a mop (I kid you not. rog thought I was nuts), then used a rope to keep the head on the post. More red spray paint covered parts of the rope, but the whole point was to make it look bloody, which it did. I then strung her up and hung her off the balcony. She greeted everyone. As you can imagine, I didn’t put this up for the 11 year olds (I don’t want to be responsible for future therapy sessions) because it even bothered the adults, who, in true form, said they loved it.
  14. Odds and ends. Little things like towels, bookends, skeleton napkin holders, hanging menus–these are all available at craft stores or wherever. Just keep an eye out for good deals. My serious Halloween gathering started 7 years ago, and has just been building. Lots of super cool things can be done with paint and a few items from Goodwill.

some kids games are up next. pumpkin bowling, bones in the bin and mummy wrapping.

The madness has begun…

2 types of spider web exists- very stringy type and
a thicker version- the stringy is best for rock and wood-
no tacs needed.

My sassiest of followers understand that somehow, somewhere along the journey of my youth I was eternally scarred by not having the ability to a) have a fully decorated spooky home, b) wander endlessly among never-ending streets of trick or treating wonder and c) entertain at my own home. This was no fault of my own or my parents- we just happen to live in the equivalent of BFE – (for my non English speaking folks that’s a crass way of saying the middle of no where).

This was only exacerbated by years of being far too corporate, missing all the good parties and then more years without children.
It makes a person weird.
But even weird people have value, right? Here’s mine.
1. Take a boring mantel and transform it with spider web yarn. 
2. Buy old dolls from Salvation Army or wherever, rough them up, spray paint green grey and red, and for good measure, wrap in spider yarn.
3. Hang in corners of said yarn.
4. If you have left overs, strategically place in soil of pots, ideally where kids can see them and freak out.


I like the spook doll in the dirt myself.

That is going to take u a long way but the next one I like even more (and yes, these are both original with me- I’m sure someone else has done this stuff, I’ve just never seen it!)

1. Go to Home Depot or any place that sells landscape tarp
2. Buy the cheap semi sheer stuff- not the super thick
3. Cut random holes inside and rough them up around the edges (I laid mine flat in the driveway- oh! Measure your windows first!)
4. Borrow your kids chalk- white or light blue work well and scrape with the flat edge. This adds the musty effect
5. For thrills take the red and throw some of that on
6. Affix with tacks- I use the clear kind and go in the seams of the wood so as not to kill my wood panels
7. Buy some netting at nearly any store- including most grocery stores, cut in thin strips and tie like a normal drape string
8. Buy cheap plastic skulls and put in the center. It’s your spooky drapes!
Last tip-
1. Get cheap, faux daisys from michaels or your old hydrangeous from the lawn (they r starting to go bad here now), some black spray paint and douse the plants with black, 
2. Put in a ratty vase or a nice one (I like the contradiction of a nice vase!) add a rubber mouse at the bottom and a dead doll. Awesome.
All this can be had for less than $50 US

Best of 2013 Halloween costumes-Chasing Fireflies 5-star review

The illustrious She started sending me spooky-time ideas in July. Was she sucked in by the costumes on display Costco or was it the prospect of making headless horseman pop cakes? Dunno and don’t care. She infected me with what Rog calls my seasonal hysteria (is that wrong? It not like I’m a 60-something shut-in. I simply like parties and happy-time things that remind me of the innocent youth I never had but still want. But I digress.

I get online. I come across Chasing Fireflies, a site for all things costume and get a catalog (Ill admit I’m old school. I like nothing better than to fire up overhead chill out music, fill the claw foot tub with scalding water and light the candle and glance through design and architecture mags- and costumes count).
The white witch

I’m soaking as I flick through the pages and tag a bunch. Incentive. Creative and look well made, hit that’s the big question- are they quality or crap? I can be at the local Target in 10 minutes and emerge with a costume for less than 30 bucks. Yet chasing fireflies gets me with the range of zombies, fairies, eras and styles, plus it’s inclusive of the entire family- not only skanky waitress costumes (it actually doesn’t deign to go skank-) but for dads and boys- and entire sets- pretty cool.

I take it to the girls and they weigh in. Porsche wants to be a white witch, like an upgrade Glenda with the cool factor of the wicked witch of the west, while merc goes for the fairy.
The gal who takes my order says three weeks, but it arrives in 4 days. We are all elated. The best part? High quality throughout. Heavy fabric. Lots of layers. No cheap corner cutting here. This comes with a price of course, but given that the girls can grow with these, I was willing to pay it. In fact he costumes themselves weren’t so bad-$35-64.

What upped the total to over $350 was all the accessories- the earrings, necklaces, hats, shoes and respective
brooms, for one must have the brooms.

Best halloween treats –

A week ago I threw my first, and probably last, adult halloween party, at least in this home. After 14 years of refusing to my request, Rog, out of the blue, said, “why not?” (of course, I think this was right after he’d returned home from a week of fishing for Salmon in Oregon and two days before leaving for Pinehurst, but whatever. I’ll take it).

“Witchy fingers” — the biggest hit of the night
The first thing I do is call cousin Nance, she of the ideas for the 9-foot witch that I ended up changing to a jilted bride, for lack of either witch costumes at Goodwill and the lack of ability to sew the darn thing.
“Make the eyeball trouffles” Nance recommends with all the must of a mom who had been on the road all night, ferrying her fourteen year-old daughter from Vegas to San Diego for yet another soccer championship game. “Or the witches fingers. Two kinds. Or the meringue bones. Or mummy pigs in a blanket (the party fav).”
Before I can get in a word, she promises to send me a dozen recipes that have pictures. I fret about ingredients, but she assures me I don’t have to worry.
My personal favorite-the chocolate rats (rolled in
white confectioners sugar or crushed choc graham crackers
for dark- although next time I might use sweetened dark
chocolate)
“This is American baking at its best,” she says me in a laughing-while-soothing voice. “It’s all butter, flour and some salt and vanilla extract in different measurements.” When I receive the recipes, she’s right. Save for a few recipes, the only addition is eggs and almond extract (for the almond variation of the witchy fingers) or the sweet witchy fingers, and chocolate (white and semi-sweet) for the RIP cookies an coffin brownies.
Peanut truffle eyeballs covered in white chocolate
For simplicity, I think I’m going to include a few recipes in this blog, and then break them out into separate blogs. Just for grins, I’m going to include the professional photo (from Nancy’s original emails) and then my ‘reality’ photo. It’s nice to know that they all taste the same, no matter the look (in theory, that is). 
The first thing I do is crank up some Lana Del Rey Blue Jeans remix and get going.
And because I had nothing better to do, I used the ‘spooky template’ from Microsoft Powerpoint, changed the words and printed out a “Slimy Sarah’s Best Rancid Recipes. I overlayed this on top of my oldest and most word Barefoot Contessa Cookbook. I’m sure she didn’t mind.


Best Halloween Treats- Sweet Witchy Fingers

The only difference between this recipe and the original “almond” witchy fingers is that this has more sugar (shocker) and no almonds. the outcome on the dough is about the same.

Ingredients

2 tablespoons red food coloring

The almond with the skin gone

30 blanched almonds
2 large eggs (room temperature is best)
1/4 tsp pure vanilla extract
8 tbs unsalted butter (1 stick) room temp
1/2 confectioners sugar
5 tbs white granulated sugar
pinch of salt
1 2/3 cup flour

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with Silpats (French nonstick baking mats) or parchment paper, and set aside.
  2. Place food coloring in a shallow bowl. Using a small paintbrush, color one rounded half of each almond. Set aside to dry.
  3. Separate 1 egg. Set aside the white. In a small bowl, whisk together yolk, remaining egg, and vanilla. Set aside.
  4. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine butter, confectioners’ sugar, granulated sugar, and salt. Beat on medium speed until well combined. Add egg mixture, and beat until smooth, about 2 minutes. Add the flour, and mix on low speed just until incorporated. Wrap the dough in plastic, and chill until firm, 20 to 30 minutes.
  5. Divide the dough in half. Work with one piece at a time, keeping remaining dough covered with plastic wrap and chilled. Divide the first half into 15 pieces. On a lightly floured surface, roll each piece back and forth with palms into finger shapes, 3 to 4 inches long. Pinch dough in two places to form knuckles. Score each knuckle lightly with the back of a small knife. Transfer fingers to prepared baking sheets. Repeat with remaining dough.
  6. When all fingers are formed, brush lightly with egg white. Position almond nails; push into dough to attach.
  7. After the fact, I made the sweet
    witchy fingers w/ black nails
    Tip: Unless you are going to eat immediately,
    place in a container or the cookies will dry out 
  8. Bake until lightly browned, about 12 minutes. Cool completely.

Best halloween Treats- Almond Witchy Fingers

Witchy fingers- you can use any color for the nails
I mixed it up with black

Almond Witchy Fingers

Ingredients
1 cup sugar
1 egg (room temp best)
1 tsp Almond extract
1 tsp Vanilla extract
2 2/3 cup Flour
1 tsp Salt
3/4 cup whole Almonds, blanched
2 squares melting chocolate (optional)

Directions

1. Combine the sugar, egg, butter, almond extract, and vanilla in a bowl. Mix in the flour, and salt. Cover and refrigerate the dough for about 30 minutes, or until it’s firm.
Once you have the (chilled) dough, use a scooper to create
a nice uniformity of size
Cut the ball in two or you will have ginormous fingers
Roll out the door
Enlist your kids and start painting
2. When you’re ready to shape the cookies, only take out a small portion of the dough at a time. Shape the cookies into fingers by rolling and working with your hands. Score the top of the cookie with a knife or spatula to make it look like the wrinkles in your knuckle. Press an imprint into the tip of the cookie with your finger to make a spot for the almond finger nail. Press an almond into the tip of each finger to look like a fingernail.
3. Placed on a cooking sheet lightly coated with no-stick cooking spray and bake at 325` for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the cookies are a very light golden brown. Let the cookies cool on a drying rack.
This will make about 30 fingers (depending on how
much dough you devour)

Tips:
1. I was very intimated by this, since I’m as artistically akin to a walrus (I flounder in my fatness on the beach as I watch others do the real work). However, used my scooper (same as previous recipe) to place the (chilled) dough on the parchment paper (on the cookie sheet). I failed on the first two attempts, as this resulted in a Fessick-size finger (that would be the giant in The Princess Bride). Go for something more human size. I then cut the dough ball in half. This was more realistic.
Remember to ‘score’ the fingers to make it took realistic
2. Round the dough into a ball (rolling between your palms)
3. Using your fore-and middle fingers, roll the dough on a flat surface (I used my breadboard with a bit of flour), pressing a little harder, resulting in one end being a little thinner.
4. Cut your time down dramatically by skipping the chocolate rims. I made it easy on myself and fun for the kids. I took a paintbrush, dropped red food coloring in a ramiken and painted the top of the (dried) blanched almonds. It definitely needed 2-3 coats to attain the deep-red color.
Allow the fingers to cool entirely before moving.
5. Last but not least- this recipe didn’t call for an egg white application, but I added it after the first batch looked–boring. Take 1 egg white and apply a nice, thin coating (using another paintbrush). This makes the finger shine in a nice-crusty-sort of way.
6. OH! be sure to push the almond fingernails in the dough a little ways–otherwise the fingernails will fall off.

Best Halloween Treats- Peanut Butter & White Chocolate Eyeballs

Peanut Butter Eyeballs
This is actually more of a truffle recipe, because the peanut butter concoction isn’t baked. It’s beyond fatty, rich and creamy. The key is having the dough chilled so you can work with it during the two rounds of molding and shaping. Start with it first, as it takes the most time.
Ingredients
1 1/2 cups creamy peanut butter
1/2 cup butter, softened
2 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
12 ounces white chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoons shortening
2 drops blue food coloring
1/2 cup miniature semisweet chocolate
chips
red food coloring (optional)
DIRECTIONS
1. Beat the peanut butter and butter with an electric mixer in a large bowl until smooth. Beat in the sugar and vanilla. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Roll chilled dough into small, eyeball-sized balls and place on 2 baking sheets lined with wax paper. Refrigerate for another 30 minutes.
2. Melt the white chocolate and shortening in a microwave-safe glass or ceramic bowl in 30-second intervals, stirring after each melting, for 1 to 3 minutes (depending on your microwave). Do not overheat or chocolate will scorch. Dip each eyeball into the white chocolate and transfer to the waxed paper until the chocolate has set. You can chill them in the refrigerator.
3. Stir a few drops of blue food coloring into the remaining melted white chocolate. Make a round “iris” on the top of the cooled eyeball and press a mini chocolate chip in the center for a “pupil.” For an extra spooky bloodshot eyeballs take a toothpick dipped in red food coloring and make squiggly lines on the eye.
This was the professional version (not use of light
blue around the eyes. I think it makes a big difference)
A couple of tips: 
1. Use a small ice cream or cantalope scooper for the dough. The provide uniformity of size and shape. Drop all these on the lined cookie sheet and put in the fridge.
After melting the chocolate, you can roll the chilled balls around in the choc and then place quickly back on the baking sheet. They will dry fast, but the longer the dough is at room temperature, the soggier it gets, which makes it harder to work with.
2. Use a squeeze bottle of food coloring instead of applying the blue with a toothpick or paintbrush. That takes way too much time. I used black for my color and it was over in seconds. Then me and my 7 year old poured a 1/2 teaspoon (or so) amount of red food coloring in a little ramiken. Take a toothpick (as directed) and then make the lines.
3. An added touch–Blue around the black eyes. My daughter was having so much fun, I then took a bit of blue, gave her a new toothpick and encouraged her to draw a ring of blue around the pupils. She did great.
Only downside of this dessert– after a few hours at room temperature, they get mushy on the inside- but the outside looks perfect.
My version- still yummy!
Next up: Witchy fingers- two versions
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